ALRESFORD AGRICULTURAL SHOW SOCIETY’S COUNTRYSIDE EDUCATION COMPETITION 2018

 

INFANTS CATEGORY: Judge’s comments about the school projects

(Schools listed in alphabetical order)

 

Ecchinswell and Sydmonton CofE Primary School: The Key Stage one classes had visited the Manydown Estate in the spring and used their visit to inspire a variety of different learning outcomes. The judges particularly enjoyed their version of ‘We’re going on a bear hunt’ which now involved a tractor which had to go through gates, long grass etc.… The pupils performed it brilliantly and it was evident that they had enjoyed writing it as a recount of their visit. Each class had used the visit differently, focusing on gardening and parks. The project books produced by each class were fabulous and showed that the pupils had covered most of the national curriculum with each focus. The written work was of a particularly high standard, and demonstrated good understanding of many issues. The pupils confidently share their work with the judges and were keen to share their knowledge.

 

North Waltham Primary School: A mix of mostly year 2 and some year 3 pupils had visited Folly farm to experience first-hand the growing of crops to make into food. Their display evidenced their understanding by the use of sequencing, showing the cycle of crop growing from seed to plant, from rain to bread. They also put together bread recipes at school using instruction words, and remembered the day by recounting what they did in short diary entries. The topic work had effectively enhanced many areas of the national curriculum and the children had clearly enjoyed themselves.

 

Sun Hill Infants School: Almost 60 key stage one pupils had visited the Manydown Estate and focussed on what they had learnt about bees. The children had explored every aspect of bees, from the hive, to honey making, to choosing the queen bee, to the collecting of honey. A local bee keeper had visited the school to further their knowledge and the children had enjoyed trying his honey samples. Overall, they were well informed and enthusiastic about the project. The Judges were particularly impressed with the hexagonal ‘bee’ tiles which were used to display the moulded 3D bees. The pupils had also experimented with making honey biscuits. All of the children questioned were able to confidently answer questions without prompting

 

Upham Primary School:

The reception class had visited Northington Farm in the spring and been inspired by many aspects of their day. The children were able to enthusiastically recount much of their trip, and had been inspired to raise funds to purchase a model farm for their classroom, which they did by selling cakes. The visit had been used to enhance the children’s learning across every aspect of the national curriculum, helping the children develop their confidence with numeracy, patterns, colours, matching, history, literacy, art work and science. The gardening sessions were clearly popular and all of the pupils happily explained the importance of sun, soil and water to help their crops grow.

 

JUNIORS CATEGORY: Judge’s comments about the school projects

(Schools listed in alphabetical order)

 

Four Lanes Community Junior School

Year 5 pupils had visited Folly Farm and used the day as a springboard to further their knowledge about bread. They had split into groups and gone into great depth, linking the bread theme to the Egyptians, baked bread in school to link to the science curriculum (reversible and irreversible reactions), explored the process of milling, researched bread-making around the world, explored the cycle of wheat growing and the machines used, and identified bread as a carbohydrate, linking it to healthy eating. They had also used their knowledge from the day to further their Space to Grow Project at school and to kept up the momentum on their composting scheme at school. All of the children questioned were able to confidently answer questions without prompting. The Judges admired the school’s use of the visit to enhance all areas of the national curriculum and the high standard of work on display.

 

Liss Junior School:

Pupils from the Resource Provision Unit had visited the Matterley Estate and met the milking herd. They had investigated the journey of milk from the cow to the shelves, and submitted descriptive work, made clay model cows, and even designed and built a model cow that the children were able to milk. They were particularly proud of the 3 course meal they had designed, a ‘dairy banquet’, which they bought from the local supermarket, prepared and cooked in school. The menu consisted of cheese and garlic bread, macaroni cheese and banana milkshakes. On the back of their visits they had also written to the local supermarket asking for information as to what price they offered farmers for their milk and whether they thought that was fair? Consequently they had designed a placard in support of farmers! There was a high level of pupil engagement across every aspect of the project, and evidence that their visit had inspired them all.

 

The Pilgrim School:

Year 3 and 4 pupils had visited Folly Farm, and learnt about the crops grown on the farm, experienced the various different machines used to grow them and enjoyed a tractor and trailer ride through the growing crops before making bread to take home. The pupils were all enthusiastic about their day, and had obviously learnt a lot about their food and where it comes from. The farm visit had been linked to a visit to a local supermarket, and both had formed the basis of a report. The bread making had been developed further, and inspired the pupils to write their own bread recipes, and imaginative postcards from the perspective of a chosen vegetable. The boys had thoroughly enjoyed the project and were able to explain a great deal about arable crops, and the farming year.

 

EXTRAORDINARY CATEGORY: Judge’s comments about the school projects

(Schools listed in alphabetical order)

 

Osborne School:

The year 7 children had clearly benefited from the project and those who had visited the Wintershill Countryside Day had learnt a great deal during their time there.  The students were very keen to share their work and to discuss some aspects in great detail. The display was very well presented, and included a wide range of outdoor related work, such as bird feeders that the students had designed, a tree mapping exercise, plant labelling activity and some stunning art work. There was evidence of a high level of pupil-led engagement across the differing abilities of the classes. There had been a great deal of learning covering a wide range of curriculum topics including D&T, science, art, english and maths.

 

Shepherds Down School:

Key Stage 2 pupils from different classes had visited a variety of farms, Northington Farm, Holden Farm and Manor Farm throughout the year. Different aspects of each visit had been used by each class to inspire a range of work which demonstrated the huge range of needs being catered for. The pupils were enthusiastic in their recounting of their experiences and were great fun. The Judges thoroughly enjoyed their explanations, and were impressed with their understanding of the many different aspects of the display. The visits had been used to enhance the pupils’ appreciation of food chains and the differences between carnivores, herbivores and omnivores, the importance of bees, and a beautiful sensory poem, amongst other things. The display evidenced a great variety of work covering many aspects of the national curriculum.

 

 

 

 

 

The judging this year was incredibly difficult as all the schools had produced great work and used their farm visits so differently. After a lot of ‘going round in circles’ we are pleased to announce that the Infants category was won by Upham Primary School, for the quality and range of work displayed, and the enthusiasm of their pupils.

 

Whilst the highly commended award goes to Sun Hill Infant School for their beautifully presented display which clearly demonstrated how much learning the children had enjoyed.

 

The Junior Category this year has been won by Liss Junior School for their wonderful exploration into the world of cows, which enhanced so many areas of the national curriculum. They were particularly impressed with the milking cow and how the pupils had become so passionate about the subject.

 

The highly commended is to be awarded to Four Lanes Junior School in recognition of their scientific approach to bread making and the high standard of understanding and work produced.

 

The Extraordinary Category this year was an incredibly close contest, with only two marks between the schools. The trophy has been awarded to Osborne School for their range of approaches to outdoor learning, and their commitment to ensuring that the pupils engaged with their outdoor space at school.

 

Whilst close on their heels, the children at Shepherds Down School are awarded a Highly Commended for their engaging display and clever use of their farm visits to enthuse all of their pupils.

 

Our thanks go to the Alresford Agricultural Show and their many supporters. Whilst, congratulations go to all the children who took part in the competition, it was clearly evident that the children had enjoyed their farm visits a lot and that a great deal of learning had taken place whilst they were on their visits and when back in the classroom.

 

The education trophies and highly commended awards will be publically presented in the education marquee at the Alresford Agricultural Show on Saturday 1st September at 2.30pm.

 

Thank you so much to all involved and we look forward to seeing you at the Show!

Bramley Primary School:
The whole of KS1 visited Folly Farm & Bassetts Farm and had focussed on bread making and the role of the farm in producing crops. The children had plaited salt dough, and been using science in their exploration in what makes the perfect bread roll by omitting individual ingredients on each bake. There was creative lego constructions of whole farms which evidenced beautifully the children’s clear understanding of the harvest process. The parable of the sower had been explored to underpin the children’s understanding and the judges were particularly impressed by the range and depth of the childrens’ thank you letters, pictures, cards which revealed how much fun they had had and how much they had got out of the day.

Fernhill Primary School:
The year 2 class had visited the Manydown Estate in the spring and enjoyed all of the activities there. With ‘James and the Giant Peach’ as their focus the pupils used the bug hunt in the woods as their inspiration for a fantastic display which demonstrated a detailed understanding of the many different types of bugs. The children had constructed a large bug hotel and written clear instructions for its build, as well as producing some lovely colourful mega beast artwork. The pupils confidently explained their display and enjoyed sharing their knowledge.

North Waltham Primary School:
Yr 2 & 3 had visited the Highclere Estate and the children who had been chosen to present the display showed great enthusiasm for the project and communicated their classwork exceptionally well. Grains had been brought back from the visit and grown in pots, with great success. The children had used their experience on the farm to create pieces of imaginative writing and had written thank you letters. There was a high level of child ownership & involvement and they had clearly enjoyed the day enormously.

Sun Hill Infants School:
60 KS1 pupils had visited Folly Farm & Bassetts Farm and used their visit to inspire a term’s work of farm-related learning. This included creating a Nature Rangers programme to inspire the children, using coding skills, hand-rearing ducklings, clay work producing 3D flowers on tiles, an additional visit to the local watercress beds, making smoothies, fishcakes out of the watercress, growing potatoes and more. The project was broad-reaching and highly engaging and the children clearly had enjoyed every aspect of their work. The Judges were particularly impressed with how the learning had been shared with the rest of the school and the wider community.

St Bede Primary School:
These year 2 pupils had visited both Holden Farm and Herriard Park Estate, and whilst they enjoyed a variety of activities the main focus at both venues for the children had been the farm machinery. The children enthusiastically explained the roles of the different tractors, and had researched the John Deere brand in detail. Their junk modelled tractors had been well planned, with the success of their own designs being critically assessed. The topic work had effectively enhanced many areas of the national curriculum and the children had clearly enjoyed themselves.

St Lawrence Primary School:
A class of reception pupils had visited the Herriard Estate and had chosen to focus on the growing/selling aspect of farming, rather than animals to extend the childrens’ knowledge and challenge their perception of farming being solely related to animal husbandry. This was done to great effect with large, colourful displays showing different crops, machinery, 3D collages showing how some crops, such as carrots, grow underground. There was a high degree of child ownership and they had clearly learnt a lot of new information. Flower collages made from hand-picked flowers on the day were impressive and seeds planted on the day on the estate had been tended well and were growing back at school.

Twyford St Mary Primary School:
The whole school had walked to their local farm, Manor Farm, in Twyford and had had a fantastic day out. The reception displays were excellent and the children were very enthusiastic about their day. The older children had absorbed a lot of new information and were keen to talk about the journey the crops took once they had been harvested and left the farm: barley to China, beans to Egypt, rapeseed oil to Southampton. They were keen to share their new knowledge about beef rearing, that the females are kept for breeding & the males are sent to slaughter. They all enjoyed the tractor rides and had thoroughly enjoyed the day.

JUNIORS CATEGORY: Judge’s comments about the school projects

(Schools listed in alphabetical order)

Marnel Junior School:
The year 3 pupils visited Northington Farm and fell in love with the new born lambs that they had seen. Their exploration into the role of sheep within the UK included studying their history and depicting the different breed characteristics on a large map of the UK. Whilst the cheese tasting at the farm, inspired research and data gathering on which cheeses made with sheep milk the children had enjoyed the most. Despite the long time lapse since the visit the children were all enthusiastic and able to independently share their extensive knowledge of sheep. All of the children questioned were able to confidently answer questions without prompting and keen to show us Audrey, the pom pom sheep, a life size sheep covered in a unique fleece demonstrated the D&T element of the project, a fabulous work of art that the children were all very rightly proud of. The Judges admired the school’s use of the visit to enhance all areas of the national curriculum and the high standard of work on display.

Park Primary School:
The year 4 pupils had enjoyed a recent visit to the Highclere Estate and enjoyed learning about the farm and meeting the dogs. The tour of the secret garden was a particular highlight as they were able to compare it to their own efforts in the school garden. The whole class has worked hard since the spring growing a wide selection of fruit and vegetables from seed, studying germination, the plants’ differing growth patterns and uses of the vegetables they had grown. Their learning journals evidenced a high standard of work linked to ‘growing’ such as germination, plant structure and the water cycle. The children questioned were all confident and informative about the garden and the care of the plants, with all 3 now growing vegetables at home.

St Michaels Junior School:
The year 3 pupils had visited the Herriard Park Estate quite recently, and used many elements of the trip to inspire their display work. The work was all well presented and produced to a high standard. The children had produced colourful haiku poems, investigated the elements needed for plants to grow and designed their own farm vehicles. It was clear that the children had learnt a lot whilst on the trip and been inspired to work hard on the class based tasks. The Judges particularly liked the pupils’ scientific approach to the growing of their beans, and how well they understood the need for warmth, water and sunlight. The farm machinery was also well planned, and they were impressed with the children being encouraged to review the success of their work and assess how they could improve.

Whitchurch Primary School:
The year 3 pupils had very recently visited Folly Farm and Bassetts Farm, yet despite the short time scale the work on display was colourful, well considered and clearly demonstrated that a lot of high quality learning had taken place. The pupils were all enthusiastic and without any teacher input explained, enthused and expanded upon the work being shown. The different written work provided the Judges with a detailed account of the visit. The Judges were particularly impressed with the planned farmers market, with the pupils’ bread, butter, flowers and vegetables soon to be sold to parents.

EXTRAORDINARY CATEGORY

(for schools accommodating children with special needs): Judge’s comments about the school project)

(Schools listed in alphabetical order)

Liss Junior School:
A class of KS2 children had visited the Bereleigh Estate and the judges enjoyed the wide variety of output, with a focus on sheep that the children had been inspired to produce after their day. Most notably, a life-size model of a sheep had been made out of an upturned table, willow from the school grounds, and the children had been weaving wool in and out of the willow structure to form the body. The result was most effective & wonderfully creative. The children were clearly delighted with their work and proud of all that they had achieved. They had focussed on food chains, had explored sheep shelters, creating models of shelters they had designed themselves and had clearly learnt a huge amount and were highly engaged in the process.

Osborne School:
The year 7 children had clearly benefited hugely from their time, at Holden Farm, Chilton Manor Farm & at the Wintershill Countryside Day. There was a high level of pupil ownership and engagement, covering a wide range of curriculum topics including D&T, science, art, english and maths. The visits had even enhanced the childrens’ celebrations of World Book Day visits had even enhanced the childrens’ celebrations of World Book Day school. There was evidence of a high level of pupil-led engagement across the differing abilities of the classes. The judges felt that there was an impressive depth and quality to the work and the children were immensely proud of all that they had achieved. Their particular favourites were the bee piñatas and the carbon footprints on the floor.

 

The judging this year was incredibly difficult as all the schools had produced great work and used their farm visits so differently. After a lot of ‘going round in circles’ we are pleased to announce that the Infants category was won by St Bede Primary School, for the sheer technical detail, variety of output and child ownership.

Two highly commended awards will given this year as the competition was strong and the judges felt that both schools needed rewarding. These will be awarded to North Waltham Primary School for the childrens’ work and the successful growing of crops at school & Sun Hill Infant School for their wide range of output and child learning.

The Junior Category this year has been won this year by Marnel Junior School for their wonderful exploration into the world of sheep, which had enhanced all areas of the national curriculum. They were particularly impressed with the high level of pupil ownership and involvement.

Whilst a highly commended is to be awarded to St Michaels Junior School for the impressive depth of their work and use of the visit as a basis for the tasks on show.
The Extraordinary Category this year has been awarded to Liss Junior School for their highly engaging and in-depth study of sheep and, in particular, for their life-size model of a sheep that the children had been weaving throughout the term.

The highly commended is awarded to Osborne School for the range of curriculum topics that had been covered as a result of their visits.

Our thanks go to the Robertson family of Wield who sponsored this year’s Countryside Adventure Competition. Whilst, congratulations go to all the children who took part in the competition, it was clearly evident that the children had enjoyed their farm visits a lot and that a great deal of learning had taken place whilst they were on their visits and when back in the classroom.

The education trophies and highly commended awards will be publically presented in the education marquee at the Alresford Agricultural Show on Saturday 2nd September at 2.30pm.
Thank you so much to all involved and we look forward to seeing you at the Shows!

The judging this year was incredibly difficult as all the schools had produced great work and used their farm visits so differently. After a lot of ‘going round in circles’ we are pleased to announce that the Infants category was won by St Bede Primary School, for the sheer technical detail, variety of output and child ownership.

A highly commended award is to be given to Sun Hill Infants School, as the Judges were so impressed with their farm shop concept.

The Junior Category this year has been won this year by Osborne School for their breath taking creativity and the high level of pupil ownership and involvement.

Whilst a highly commended is to be awarded to Sun Hill Junior School for the impressive depth of their work and the interesting angles of study.

Our thanks go to the Robertson family of Wield who sponsored this year’s Countryside Adventure Competition. Whilst, congratulations go to all the children who took part in the competition, it was clearly evident that the children had enjoyed their farm visits a lot and that a great deal of learning had taken place whilst they were on their visits and when back in the classroom.

The education trophies and highly commended awards will be publically presented in the education marquee at the Alresford Agricultural Show on Saturday 3rd September at 2.30pm.

Thank you so much to all involved.